ErrantScience best of 2017

It’s almost the end of 2017 and it’s been quite a year. Which is about as nicely as I can talk about 2017. But here on ErrantScience 2017 we’ve had some amazing content and while everyone is busy eating giant meals, hiding from family members and looking for gift receipts I thought it would be good to highlight some of the most popular blog posts of the year.

Below are the five most read articles from 2017. If you missed them then go read and find out why they were so popular, if you’ve already read them then go read them again and enjoy them a second time! [Click on the titles to go read them!]

Should you do a PhD? – A flow diagram

Ever been a bit conflicted over if you should be starting a PhD in 2018. Well this surprisingly useful and almost accurate flow diagram should help you out. If you do a PhD based on this and don’t like we cannot be held legally responsible. But you can be mad at us.

How to survive a PhD viva: a terrible guide no one should follow…

PhD viva’s are scary things but what makes them scarier is not being properly prepared. This guide provides all the tips you need to absolutely avoid if you want to pass your viva. Best of luck!

Explaining the academic system of self inflicted overworking

This article explains why I’m writing this summary at 22:20 on Christmas eve and not during normal working hours. The TL;DR is that academics work too hard and it’s only partially their fault.

Your project is going to fail, everything will explode and you’ll probably get fired

Every project starts with a lot of emotions and worry about it’s future. This article talks about how scary it is to start on something hard, difficult and unknown but that’s okay. This article is best read at about 2am when you’re having a panic attack about how everything in your project is failing.

The importance of the coffee break

Amazing though it might seem but not everyone is convinced of how amazing coffee breaks are. This is a travesty and these people must be properly educated at once. This article should go someway to helping you explain the importance of coffee (or tea) breaks to a happy researcher environment… also biscuits.

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