As I write this I have on my desk next to me, my lunch.

Today it consists of a bagel filled with some left over BBQ chicken, a small Tupperware box with a piece of unicorn birthday cake and a bottle of water (so exciting)

I normally bring something in to eat either with my colleagues or while I go for a walk round the park next to campus. About once a month I treat myself and go buy noodles. Noodle day is the best.

This blog avowed purpose is to help explain and show the inner working of research and science. Most of the time I choose what topics to focus on or write about because they are topics that as a budding researcher I’d want to read. But the subject of my lunch was chosen because apparently the above exciting list of my lunch is surprising and not at all what my undergrad students expect.

Over the last year I have had multiple students react with surprise when they have either met me walking around with my lunch box or when we’ve talked about lunch plans. The reason varies slightly but essentially boils down to “but you’re too senior?!”

As a supervisor the idea that I am making sandwiches out of leftovers seems weird apparently! My status means that I should be eating a higher caliber lunch closer to my level up the ladder.

I can only guess what these fancy lunch are but talking to students and people online I have three options at my level. Buying fancy sandwiches (no bringing in a pack of ones from Tesco, but M&S might be okay), eating out at a ‘senior’ researcher/staff restaurant/canteen or not having anything and working through lunch.

Unfortunately for me, all the sandwich places are expensive (especially M&S), the vast majority of restaurants around here kebab shops and lastly, I’m not a workaholic and don’t fancy starting working through lunch everyday.

So in order to maintain the illusion of seniority I need to either go broke, get a lot less picky about what I eat or starve in my office.

I’ve even had students act surprise to hear that I occasionally eat my lunch with/in-front of students. This might not be anything to do with my status and may have more to do with my table manners, so that may be legitimate.

As you go up the academic (or industry) ladder there is no requirement or need to start suddenly eating food that is fitting your station.

We’re all just people that like lunch and science.

I know professors that eat pot noodles. I know BSc students that eat out a restaurants every day. What you have for lunch says a lot more about where you like to spend your money and a lot less about you as a researcher or supervisor

I am just as capable of research on the days when I treat myself to going out for lobster noodles in a gold flake sauce as when I eat left over spaghetti in a sandwich made with the ends of a loaf of bread.

Unless I go out for lunch to that dodgy curry van just off campus in that carpark. That might temporarily impact my ability to do research about 1-2 hours after I’ve eaten it.

Categories: ErrantWritings

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